Creamy BLT Gnocchi

Creamy BLT Gnocchi

It’s supposed to be close to 100 degrees outside today, so naturally I’m taking this opportunity to share a rich, creamy gnocchi dish that requires you to turn the stove on. 👍🏼👍🏼👍🏼

I promise it’s worth it, though. This BLT gnocchi comes together in about half an hour (yay for quick and easy meals!) and it reheats really well, so you can snack on the leftovers for days afterwards without losing any flavor. [Read more…]

Parmesan and Spinach Orzo

When I was little, I always gave my mom a hard time about making orzo. I picked a fight every time we ate it because “it’s not pasta, it’s rice!” and would have to sit there and (un)patiently listen to her tell me that it is, in fact, pasta. It was a whole big thing. But I’m over it (sorry, Mom). Even though it still LOOKS a lot like rice. Just saying.

Parmesan & Spinach Orzo

Anywho, my mom sent me some rice orzo in a care package awhile back, and I recently discovered the last half of the package sitting in my pantry. “Eureka!” I thought. “I’ll make some orzo!” [Read more…]

Potato and Cheese Pierogis

Last Saturday was a pretty important holiday in our house. Bigger than Easter or Thanksgiving or Cinco de Mayo or St. Patrick’s day and ALMOST as big as Christmas (Christmas has CAROLS. Contest over.) But ours is a holiday that brings together all our friends from college – from a zillion different places – for a night that is THE.BEST.NIGHT.OUT.OF.ALL.THE.NIGHTS.EVER.

Last Saturday, my friends, was the GLORIOUS holiday of FAKESGIVING. Not-quite-a-real-thanksgiving (hence the “fake” part), but DEFINITELY awesome enough to merit its own title and a permanent place on our holiday calendar. (Think turkey legs being awarded as prizes to a lucky few while the Bulls walk-out song plays in the background or grown frat boys dancing to Cher with the wine/beer/tequila a-flowin’.) We like to call it the greatest holiday you’ve never heard of. Maybe next year I’ll have it together enough to take pictures. (But probably not).

It started in college as a way to celebrate with each other before we all went home for the holidays, and because we wanted an excuse to eat a ridiculous amount of food for a semi-legitimate reason. Now that we’re sort-of-adults, we get back together to recreate the undergrad magic (read: acting like idiots and eating way more than our post-college metabolisms can handle). Kyle makes the turkey and I take care of the side dishes. (The turkey is the best turkey ever, by the way. Maybe someday he’ll let me share the recipe).

And that brings me to these potato and cheese pierogis. I mentioned yesterday how Kyle is part Polish (hiiiiii, Kyle) and has brought pierogis into my life (THANKS!). They’re now a Fakesgiving regular. Carb-o-licious but still super unique. And RIDICULOUSLY delicious. Last weekend, we made about a hundred (!!!) so we could keep some extras in the freezer to eat whenever the fancy strikes us. (Like right now…helloooo, dinner).

Bottom line: you, too, should add these to your Thanksgiving (or, y’know, Tuesday) menu. Polish or not. You won’t regret it.

Potato and Cheese Pierogis
 
YIELD: Makes 50
INGREDIENTS
For the Dough:
  • 3 and ½ cups flour, plus extra for dustin when you roll the dough out
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • ¼ cup sour cream
  • ¾ to 1 cup water
For the Filling:
  • 5 medium-sized red potatoes
  • 2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ¼ of a large yellow onion, chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • ½ tsp. dried thyme
  • 2 Tbsp. milk (I use skim)
  • ½ cup parmesan cheese, shredded
  • ½ cup fontina cheese, shredded
  • 3-4 Tbsp. unsalted butter, for frying
INSTRUCTIONS
For the Dough:
  1. In a large bowl, mix flour, eggs, salt, and sour cream together. Gradually add water, a few tablespoons at a time, working dough in between each addition. Dough is done when it comes together and feels smooth but not sticky. You probably won’t use all of the water – I use about ¾ cup each time.
  2. Wrap dough in plastic and chill in the fridge for at least thirty minutes while you prepare the filling.
  3. When it’s time to form the pierogis, remove dough from fridge and roll it out approx. ½ cup at a time (to prevent overworking it) on a floured surface until it is about ⅛? thick.
  4. Cut dough into circles with a cookie cutter or a glass turned upside down. I usually make my dough circles about 2.5? in diameter.
  5. Put about ½ tsp. of filling in the center of each dough circle. Fold the top of the circle over the filling and pinch the ends together with your fingertips to seal the pierogi. I like to start pinching the dough together in the center of the pierogi and working my way to the edges – this gives me more control over the edge and lets me make it kind of a scalloped finish (like in the pictures). It takes some practice – don’t give up!
  6. Cook pierogis in boiling water for 4 minutes and then transfer to a SUPER hot skillet with a tiny bit of butter. Fry for about 2 minutes on each side or until they develop a nice, brown, crispy crust.
  7. Top with Sour Cream and Chive sauce. (YUMM-O).
For the Filling:
  1. Slice the potatoes into quarters and put in a large pot. Cover the potatoes with water and bring to a boil. Cook potatoes for about 30 minutes or until they can be easily mashed with a fork or spoon.
  2. Drain the potatoes in a colander. Return the pot to the stove.
  3. Heat olive oil in the pot. Add garlic, onion, salt, pepper, and thyme and saute until onion is translucent, about 4 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Return the potatoes to the pot with the garlic/thyme/onion mixture. Add milk to the pot and mash with a potato masher.
  5. Add fontina and parmesan cheeses to potato mixture. Stir the cheese into the potatoes with a spoon or spatula until cheese is melted and potatoes are smooth. Let cool for at least 30 minutes before you form the pierogis (I usually make the potatoes the day before and keep them in the fridge overnight – makes for less work the next day!)
  6. When it’s time to form the pierogis, remove dough from fridge and roll it out approx. ½ cup at a time (to prevent overworking it) on a floured surface until it is about ⅛? thick.
  7. Cut dough into circles with a cookie cutter or a glass turned upside down. I usually make my dough circles about 2.5? in diameter.
  8. Put about ½ tsp. of filling in the center of each dough circle. Fold the top of the circle over the filling and pinch the ends together with your fingertips to seal the pierogi. I like to start pinching the dough together in the center of the pierogi and working my way to the edges – this gives me more control over the edge and lets me make it kind of a scalloped finish (like in the pictures). It takes some practice – don’t give up!
  9. Cook pierogis in boiling water for 4 minutes and then transfer to a SUPER hot skillet with a tiny bit of butter (I recommend melting it in the pan about 1 teaspoon at a time in between each batch of pierogis). Fry for about 2 minutes on each side or until they develop a nice, brown, crispy crust. Be careful not to overcrowd the pot or the skillet – pierogis should have enough room to cook while still being in a single layer so they don’t stick to each other or cook at different speeds.
  10. Top with Sour Cream and Chive sauce. (YUMM-O).
NOTES